“Wouldn’t this make the most amazing wallpaper in a sacred space?”~Lisa #Repost @brooklynmuseum ・・・ #IsidroEscamilla painted this work of Virgin of Guadalupe shortly after the 1821 Act of Independence, which formalized the end of Spanish rule in New Spain. During the Wars of Independence (1810–1821), the Virgin was adopted as a nationalist symbol of Mexican liberation, supporting the idea that independence was divinely ordained. Years later, in the U.S., she became integral to the cultural identity of Mexican-Americans, as well as to the Chicano movement which begun in the 1960s. Guadalupe has continued to serve as a symbol for communicating social, cultural, and political issues as evidenced in the work of contemporary Chicana artists who have re-contextualized the image of the Virgin, and utilized her as a symbol of community and resistance through a feminist lens. #hispanicheritagemonth (at Brooklyn Museum)

“Wouldn’t this make the most amazing wallpaper in a sacred space?”~Lisa #Repost @brooklynmuseum
・・・
#IsidroEscamilla painted this work of Virgin of Guadalupe shortly after the 1821 Act of Independence, which formalized the end of Spanish rule in New Spain. During the Wars of Independence (1810–1821), the Virgin was adopted as a nationalist symbol of Mexican liberation, supporting the idea that independence was divinely ordained. Years later, in the U.S., she became integral to the cultural identity of Mexican-Americans, as well as to the Chicano movement which begun in the 1960s. Guadalupe has continued to serve as a symbol for communicating social, cultural, and political issues as evidenced in the work of contemporary Chicana artists who have re-contextualized the image of the Virgin, and utilized her as a symbol of community and resistance through a feminist lens. #hispanicheritagemonth (at Brooklyn Museum)